Interdisciplinary Studies

  • Credits: 32
  • Degree:
    Masters of Education with Concentration

Program Description

The Interdisciplinary Studies program enables students to develop their own program in consultation with a faculty advisor to augment their knowledge and professional skills and, in some instances, prepare for a career transition. Students select courses from among the College’s offerings in any or all disciplines. They are expected to articulate a rationale for each course selected. (Note: the program cannot prepare students for licensure.)

Learning Outcomes

Students learn to integrate information from interdisciplinary perspectives and enhance their creativity, insightfulness, and unconventional but considered thinking. They improve their higher-order cognitive skills, capacity for independent thinking, and autonomous action. They employ meta-cognition in the classroom and in life circumstances, make connections among seeming dissimilarities; appreciate and enjoy questions, ambiguity, and paradox. Students interrogate diverse world views and become cognizant of ethical dimensions of issues and dilemmas.

Assessment

Students meet with their faculty advisor to assess their progress in meeting their program goals as part of a formative evaluation process.

Independent Learning Project

Students will research and write about a topic that supports their post-graduate endeavors and/or personal growth.

Careers

Our graduates pursue a wide variety of jobs that involve a significant element of educating. They are tutors and teachers; personal, academic, and athletic coaches; actors; family advocates and mediators; clergy; college faculty and administrators; and more. They work in schools and colleges, nonprofit organizations and human services, the criminal justice system; religious organizations, community planning and development, the criminal justice system, and corporations.

 

For more information, please contact Admissions at 1-800-829-4723.

Curriculum


Professional Seminar & Project
9
Credits

EED 800 Independent Learning Project

Professional Seminar I: Education
EED 691 2 credit(s)
The Professional Seminar is a signature element of the adult learning model at Cambridge College. It grounds learning in a cohort group of students with a faculty leader. The seminar is a forum for discussion of professional issues in education, such as what it means to be an educator today, and how educators can work in the organizational culture of schools and contribute to social progress. Students integrate their learning from classes, workshops, and experience. Transformed by reflection, readings, and discussion, students become reflective practitioners and lifelong learners. The seminar also supports students’ work on their independent learning projects, from identifying topics, to guiding the research and writing, to completion. The seminar leader approves the finished projects.
Professional Seminar II: Education
EED 692 2 credit(s)
The Professional Seminar is a signature element of the adult learning model at Cambridge College. It grounds learning in a cohort group of students with a faculty leader. The seminar is a forum for discussion of professional issues in education, such as what it means to be an educator today, and how educators can work in the organizational culture of schools and contribute to social progress. Students integrate their learning from classes, workshops, and experience. Transformed by reflection, readings, and discussion, students become reflective practitioners and lifelong learners. The seminar also supports students’ work on their independent learning projects, from identifying topics, to guiding the research and writing, to completion. The seminar leader approves the finished projects.
Professional Seminar III: Education
EED 693 2 credit(s)
The Professional Seminar is a signature element of the adult learning model at Cambridge College. It grounds learning in a cohort group of students with a faculty leader. The seminar is a forum for discussion of professional issues in education, such as what it means to be an educator today, and how educators can work in the organizational culture of schools and contribute to social progress. Students integrate their learning from classes, workshops, and experience. Transformed by reflection, readings, and discussion, students become reflective practitioners and lifelong learners. The seminar also supports students’ work on their independent learning projects, from identifying topics, to guiding the research and writing, to completion. The seminar leader approves the finished projects.
Theory & Practice of Education
2
Credits

Choose two 1-credit courses in Education: EED 590 or EED 591.

Foundation Courses
6 or more
Credits

Choose six or more credits (two courses)

Motivation and Teaching: Theoriesand Practices
EED 564 3 credit(s)
The strategies teachers use in many classrooms to reinforce learning are based on the theory, “If you learn this, then I will give you that.” Much of what is taught is reinforced by extrinsic rewards such as praise, kisses and hugs, or gold stars. However, many teachers feel frustrated because they want children to love learning and to see learning as a reward in and of itself. This course will examine current research and theoretical models which can help educators understand how to develop a child’s intrinsic desire to learn by satisfying certain needs we all have within us.
3/Strategies for Teaching Critical Thinking Across the Curriculum
EED 610 3 credit(s)
Critical thinking is approached through a holistic model that stresses creative and analytic strategies. Participants consider cognitive development issues informing the design of instructional materials and methods which promote higher-order thinking. Practical strategies for immediate classroom application are a priority. An open environment promotes collegial exchange that builds on professional experiences while cultivating new skills that engage students in active learning and independent thinking. (3)
Human Brain, Human Learning
EED 647 3 credit(s)
This introductory course in brain-compatible teaching and learning will entail a review of some of the latest research findings from the neurosciences, cognitive psychology, information science, psychobiology and neurolinguistic programming. The goal of this course is to provide educators and trainers with the opportunity to learn about the role of the brain / mind in the learning process so that they will be able to read and understand current brain / mind research and apply some of the findings to their teaching practice. Some time will also be spent on accelerated learning techniques. The course would be appropriate for educators of all grade levels and subject areas as well as for corporate trainers and other trainers of adult learners.
MultiCultural Diversity Issues in the Workplace and Classroom
EED 705 3 credit(s)
This course studies (1) ethnic-cultural history, (2) prejudice, biases and value systems, and (3) the appreciation of diversity in professional skills and personal strengths. Students discuss teaching cultural diversity in various learning environments, and individuals’ power in realizing differences and similarities. Students explore ethnicity, race, gender and class from an historical and contemporary perspectives. The class looks at teaching styles and ways to manage culturally diverse classrooms. The importance of building students’ self-esteem and sensitivity to their varied learning styles are addressed. Students should come prepared with a brief overview of their ethnic/cultural history (e.g., photo albums, letters, journals, and family trees).
Elective Courses

With approval of their seminar leader, appropriate dean, appropriate program chair and the IS program chair, students may take no more than:

  • Four 3-credit courses in any program outside of the School of Education
  • Two 3-credit Independent Studies courses
  • Two 1-credit courses

With approval of their seminar leader, appropriate dean, appropriate program chair and the IS program chair, students may take courses in other School of Education programs.
 

Core Faculty

Senior Instructor

Pages

Admissions

  • Admission Test:

    No standardized graduate school tests required for admission into non-licensure programs.

  • Admissions Office:
    1-800-829-4723
  • Application Form:
  • Application Fee:
    $50, nonrefundable ($100 for international students; $100 for EdD)

School Requirements

See Admissions Requirements for School of Education

 

State Health Requirements

The Massachusetts Health Department and Cambridge College require the following of students in Massachusetts:

Immunizations – All students in Massachusetts are required to get certain immunizations before you can register for your first term. See form 

Health Insurance – In Massachusetts, undergraduate students taking nine or more credits/term and graduate students taking six or more credits/term must enroll in the College’s health insurance plan. Students who have insurance with comparable coverage may request a waiver. See information and enroll or waive.

International Students 

International students are accepted at Massachusetts location only, and need to provide supplemental documentation:

  • Official demonstration of English language proficiency
  • Supplemental documentation for issuance of I-20
  • International transcripts, evaluated by an accepted evaluation service

Transfer Credit

Graduate program applicants, please complete the transfer credit request form if you wish to have prior course work evaluated for transfer. Learn more.

Undergraduate program applicants, once you are accepted, your official transcripts are evaluated for transfer credit.

 

Tuition

  • Credits:
    32
  • Cost per credit hour:
    $515
  • Application Fee:
    $50, nonrefundable ($100 for international students; $100 for EdD)
  • Health Insurance Fee:
    $1,995 - Required for Massachusetts students only. See waiver details on Tuition & Fees page.

Note: Rates are as of September 2015, and are subject to change without notice. Rates apply to all students, unless otherwise noted.

Financial Aid

Cambridge College offers financial aid to students in our degree programs who are enrolled at least half time. Undergraduate students must be enrolled in at least 6 credits each term. Graduate and doctoral students must be enrolled in at least 4 credits each term. Learn more

Grants, Scholarships and Loans

Cambridge College welcomes the opportunity to support your efforts to pay for college.  Federal, state and local resources in the form of grants, scholarships, loans and work-study, including Cambridge College Scholarships, are available to help defray the cost of tuition. Learn more

Getting Your Company to Help

Many companies have tuition assistance programs, designed to help their employees with their professional development. Learn more