Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8 or 5-12, professional licensure - MA locations only)

  • Grade Levels: PreK-8 or 5-12
  • Credits for Licensure: 34
  • Credits: 34
  • Degree:
    Master of Education
  • Program Approved:
    Massachusetts Dept. of Elementary & Secondary Education

Program Description

The Teacher of Students With Moderate Disabilities professional level program prepares teachers with an initial license in Moderate Disabilities to complete their MA licensure requirements. 

Please note: At Cambridge College locations outside of Massachusetts, this program is currently non-licensure only.

Learning Outcomes

Graduates enhance their academic knowledge base and professional experiences as special educators with courses in pedagogy and the arts and sciences.  They successfully combine their own experiences with what they have learned in courses, research and best practices.  They demonstrate understanding of these areas through successful completion of required courses.

Careers

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts requires all teachers to complete a two-stage licensure program.   With a professional license, a teacher can continue to teach in Massachusetts schools.  With this license, a qualified teacher could be the "teacher of record" in a substantially separate classroom, a co-teacher working with general educators, or support students and faculty through consultation.

Program Chair

Mary L. Garrity
mary.garrity@cambridgecollege.edu

Curriculum

Please note: At Cambridge College locations outside of Massachusetts, this program is currently non-licensure only.


Professional Seminar and Project
7
Credits
Professional Seminar I: Special Education (Professional)
ESP 691P 2 credit(s)
The Professional Seminar is a signature element of the adult learning model at Cambridge College. It grounds learning in a cohort group of students with a faculty leader licensed in moderate needs special education. This seminar leader is the students’ academic advisor and guides them through their graduate program. The cohort studies professional standards for special needs teachers, and the requirements for state licensure as a Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities - Prek-8 and 5-12 The cohort studies professional standards for special needs teachers, and the requirements for state licensure in moderate special needs - Prek-8, 5-12. Students integrate their learning from classes, workshops, and field experience. Transformed by the resulting knowledge, competencies, attitudes and values, students become reflective practitioners and lifelong learners. The seminar also supports students’ work on their independent learning projects, from identifying topics, to guiding the research and writing, to completion. The seminar leader approves the finished projects.
Professional Seminar II: Special Education (Professional)
ESP 692P 2 credit(s)
The Professional Seminar is a signature element of the adult learning model at Cambridge College. It grounds learning in a cohort group of students with a faculty leader licensed in moderate needs special education. This seminar leader is the students’ academic advisor and guides them through their graduate program. The cohort studies professional standards for special needs teachers, and the requirements for state licensure as a Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities - Prek-8 and 5-12 The cohort studies professional standards for special needs teachers, and the requirements for state licensure in moderate special needs - Prek-8, 5-12. Students integrate their learning from classes, workshops, and field experience. Transformed by the resulting knowledge, competencies, attitudes and values, students become reflective practitioners and lifelong learners. The seminar also supports students’ work on their independent learning projects, from identifying topics, to guiding the research and writing, to completion. The seminar leader approves the finished projects.
Independent Learning Project: Special Education
ESP 800 3 credit(s)
The Independent Learning Project is a culminating learning experience that helps educators integrate their personal and formal learning and their professional experiences into a meaningful whole. It reflects the general guidelines for teachers of students with moderate dis- abilities and articulates the individual’s educational and administrative philosophy. The project is research and action-based, on a focused topic chosen by the educator, within the area of licensure. It engages educators in sustained research into educational practice and cur- riculum development; parts of the project may be implemented during the practicum.
Education Courses
choose 12
Credits
Using Multiple Intell Accel Learn Teachg Eng Lang Arts Math Hist Sci
ESP 721 3 credit(s)
Special education teachers learn to apply multiple intelligence and accelerated learning instructional strategies in teaching to the content area standards. Teachers get an overview of Howard Gardner’s multiple intelligence theory and its implications. They also experience Lozanov’s accelerated learning structures and translation to brain-based teaching. Teachers learn to select, evaluate, and use teaching and assessment differentiation strategies to meet the needs of special education students in regular education classrooms. They design multiple intelligence and accelerated learning lessons to engage students in acquiring specific knowledge and skills.
MultiCultural Diversity Issues in the Workplace and Classroom
EED 705 3 credit(s)
This course studies (1) ethnic-cultural history, (2) prejudice, biases and value systems, and (3) the appreciation of diversity in professional skills and personal strengths. Students discuss teaching cultural diversity in various learning environments, and individuals’ power in realizing differences and similarities. Students explore ethnicity, race, gender and class from an historical and contemporary perspectives. The class looks at teaching styles and ways to manage culturally diverse classrooms. The importance of building students’ self-esteem and sensitivity to their varied learning styles are addressed. Students should come prepared with a brief overview of their ethnic/cultural history (e.g., photo albums, letters, journals, and family trees).
Alternative Assessment Strategies Across the Curriculum
EED 710 3 credit(s)
This course enhances educators’ ability to develop a conceptual framework of assessment procedures to improve their teaching techniques for the wide variety of learning styles found in the classroom today. Assessment is an important component of our educational system. However, many educators are now questioning the heavy emphasis on standardized tests and the decreasing attention to the value of classroom assessment. Dissatisfied with the current methods of assessment, and motivated by the desire to improve public education, educators, policy makers, parents, and community members are focusing increased attention on how we go about determining what our students know and can do, from kindergarten through grade 12.
Effective Schools
EED 628 3 credit(s)
This course helps students attain a basic understanding of the major dimensions of effective schools. The class examines research findings and personal reflections of noted educators on the determinants of effective schooling in which all children learn; where teacher and other school employee satisfaction is at a high level; and where public confidence in the schools is very strong. Particular emphasis is on the pivotal role of school administrators, teachers, parents and students in the development and maintenance of effective schools.
Seminar in Current Educational Issues
EED 704 3 credit(s)
Professional licensure course: additional instructional hours and requirements. This course defines some concepts, philosophies, that serve as foundations for structuring schools and learning environments, including: humanistic education, essentialism, perennialism, progressivism, social reconstructivism, and critical theory. The seminar also examines critical practical realities including: change, the economy, technology and science, leisure and work, communications, the human popula­tion, ecology, government and politics, values and lifestyles. Students explore and evaluate school/learning environment structures and teaching strategies, and they make compelling arguments for their professional points of view.
Arts and Sciences Courses
15
Credits
Integration of Reading and Writing with Children's Literature
ENG 701 3 credit(s)
This course is designed to allow teachers to revisit literature as an expression of the imagination and creativity, as well as critical/expository writing and to assist teachers in integrating reading and writing skills/competencies with the teaching of children’s literature. By recognizing the value in teaching reading and writing with authentic, well-written literature, having rich and varied vocabulary, teachers will learn to integrate the teaching of reading and writing with both literary and expository written and “visual” texts. It will address language arts, specifically reading and writing, as primary areas of concern in the Massachusetts Common Core Standards and Teacher Licensure Objectives.
Students with Disabilities and Visual Arts
ESP 701 3 credit(s)
This course is for teachers who work with students with special needs. It focuses on how they can use the visual arts as an innovative approach to facilitate their students’ learning and understanding. Teachers explore how the visual arts can accommodate different learning styles by providing alternative entry points in which to learn and understand the required curricula. This approach incorporates the theory of multiple intelligences. Teachers develop an understanding of how the visual arts can help motivate students to learn, foster self-esteem and self-expression, develop motor coordination skills and enhance social skills. This is a hands-on class in which teachers become familiar with a variety of art materials, for example clay, paints, pastels, charcoal, and simple print-making techniques. They also gain a basic understanding of the principles of art history. They learn how to develop lessons and alternative assessment instruments that incorporate the visual arts. A visit to the Fogg Museum is included.
Diagnosis & Remediation of Learning Problems in Mathematics (K-12)
MAT 708 3 credit(s)
This course examines the nature of mathematics learning, major types of mathematics learning problems, and their etiology. It discusses possible causes of these problems and suggests remediation strategies that teachers and parents can use to help children learn mathematics more effectively. Teachers focus on selected areas of mathematics at the K-8 levels that challenge children, and on how to remediate and facilitate mathematics learning in classroom and one-to-one settings.
Using Educational Technology to Improve Teaching and Learning
EIT 712 3 credit(s)
Through discussion, use of the latest hardware and software, participants explore computer based multimedia and communications technologies that enhance classroom instruction. This course is geared for PreK-12 teachers to experiment with the tools of the classroom with emphasis on math, science and language arts. Software and Internet applications are explored, including best practice applications. Focus is on developing technology-based thematic units that integrate theory, practice and standards in the language arts, science, and math classroom. Recent developments in technology integration regarding math and language with the No Child Left Behind Act are discussed.
Impact of Technology on Education
EIT 703 3 credit(s)
Educators will improve teaching and learning in the classroom by using educational technology. The course includes an overview of technology’s impact on education, evaluation of educational software, integration of multimedia applications, the World Wide Web, curriculum frameworks integration, and hands-on experience in the development of instructional materials. Practical examples of successful schools are examined. Educators also gain experience with a variety of educational software related to the curriculum. Strategies for inclusion of special needs students are explored.

Core Faculty

Senior Instructor

Pages

Admissions

  • Admission Test:

    Passing grade on TOEFL (English language proficiency test) is required for international students.

  • Admissions Office:
    1-800-829-4723
  • Application:
  • Application Fee:
    $50, nonrefundable ($100 for international students; $100 for EdD)

Program Requirements

Applicants must have initial license in Moderate Special Education along with three full years of experience in the role of that license.

General Requirements

Official Transcript
Two Completed Recommendation Forms
Current Résumé

Personal Statement

Learn more about General Requirements 

State Requirements

College students are required to comply with state laws regarding individual health insurance and immunization. Compliance requirements currently exist for students in Massachusetts, Virginia and Tennessee. Learn more

International Students – Additional Requirements

International Students will need to complete supplemental documentation when applying. International transcripts must also be translated prior to submission in order to be evaluated for applicability. Learn more about international student requirements.

Transfer Credit Request Form

Only needed if you wish to have prior course work evaluated for transfer credit. Learn more about transferring credits.

 

Tuition

  • Credits for Licensure:
    34
  • Credits:
    34
  • Cost per credit hour:
    $475
  • Application Fee:
    $50, nonrefundable ($100 for international students; $100 for EdD)
  • Graduation Fee:
    $110 (charged in last term)
  • Health Insurance Fee:
    $1,296 - Required for Massachusetts students only. See waiver details on Tuition & Fees page.

Note: Rates are as of September 2013, and are subject to change without notice. Rates apply to all students, unless otherwise noted.

Financial Aid

Cambridge College offers financial aid to students in our degree programs who are enrolled at least half time. Undergraduate students must be enrolled in at least 6 credits each term. Graduate and doctoral students must be enrolled in at least 4 credits each term. Learn more

Grants, Scholarships and Loans

Cambridge College welcomes the opportunity to support your efforts to pay for college.  Federal, state and local resources in the form of grants, scholarships, loans and work-study, including Cambridge College Scholarships, are available to help defray the cost of tuition. Learn more

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