Medical Interpreter Certificate

  • Credits: 18
  • Degree:
    Undergraduate Certificate

Program Description

Students learn about anatomy, diagnoses, lab tests, prescription medicines, and medical treatments. They learn about the cultural beliefs and values of all parties and their role as interpreter, the history of medicine in the U.S., and medical insurance. They learn about the legislation that has mandated interpreter services in medical/health settings.
Students practice ethical decision making, patient/client advocacy, and conflict mediation in preparation for an internship under the supervision of a professional interpreter/mentor.
Some students and their families have experienced difficulties getting the medical care they need in the U.S., due to language barriers. Some have had medical education or related work experience in their home countries. They all want to help people get the medical care they need, who have difficulty communicating with English-speaking medical professionals.

Program Outcomes

Students will learn how to meet the communication needs of patients/clients and providers. They will:

  • Become fluent in the bilingual terminology of human anatomy and the medical/health field.
  • Increase their fluency in English.
  • Develop cross-cultural communication and interpreting skills.
  • Provide effective interpretation in medical/health settings.

Careers and Further Study

Graduates get jobs as medical interpreters in hospitals, clinics, medical practices, and interpreter agencies. For some, this is their career goal. For others, interpreting is a good transition into other medical careers. They may become more familiar with the American medical community and network within it, improve their English, and get further medical education and credentials.

Degree Credit Option

Students enrolled in a bachelor’s degree program may take medical interpreting courses with the understanding that these courses are part of their degree program and will be charged the bachelor’s degree tuition. Students who do not complete the bachelor’s degree will be held responsible for the bachelor’s degree tuition costs of all courses taken, in accordance with federal financial aid guidelines.

Non-Credit Option

Professional development certificate is non-credit and cannot be applied to a degree. The cost is reduced, but is not eligible for financial aid.

Program Chair

Norma Green
norma.green@cambridgecollege.edu

 

Curriculum


Medical Interpreter Courses - Non-Credit
18
Credits
Medical Interpreter Anatomy and Pathophysiology
INT 100 3 credit(s)
(Formerly SCI100) This course surveys the human body in health and disease in order to expose students who plan to work in health care to the major systems of the body, common diseases, diagnostic tests, pharmaceuticals and treatment options. Students learn how to define complex medical terms, concepts and abbreviations, and apply this knowledge according to their area of interest.
The Role of the Interpreter
INT 415 3 credit(s)
(Formerly SOC415) This course focuses on the history of health care and social work, various cultures within our society, and the role of medical interpreters in the United States. Issues about advocacy that often impinge upon the interpreter-client relationship are examined. Students learn about confidentiality, patient rights, ethical and legal issues, as well as laws governing federal and state human-service agencies.
Interpreting Skills I Multilingual
INT 352 3 credit(s)
(Formerly COM352) Multilingual. Prerequisite: proficiency in other languages. Students already fluent in the language will learn the theoretical basis of interpretation and translation, and applied interpreting skills and techniques for medical or human service settings. Emphasis is placed on bilingual vocabulary and phraseology, and practice of interpreting skills through role play.
Interpreting Skills II Multilingual
INT 355 3 credit(s)
(Formerly COM355.) Prerequisites: Interpreting Skills I, LLIC010/INT100 . Students integrate and apply the interpretation and translation theory learned in Skills I through extensive practice of simulations, predominantly in the consecutive mode. Students learn self-monitoring and coping strategies. They continue to develop bilingual medical and human service vocabulary and phraseology as well as explore the challenges of simultaneous interpretation.
Cross Cultural Communications
INT 412 3 credit(s)
(Formerly SOC-412) This course provides the participants with the opportunity to identify cross-cultural issues and their impact on the medical interpretation encounter. Students will analyze concepts such as communication, culture, cultural identity, non-verbal communication and cultural context related to interpretation. Readings of selected short stories that illustrate cross-cultural concepts will provide the basis for cultural contextual analysis.
Interpreter Internship
INT 300 3 credit(s)
Prerequisites: LLIC010/INT100, LLIC011/INT415, and Interpreting Skills I. Students strengthen and refine their interpreting skills at a local internship site. They are evaluated for ability to work with providers and clients and to demonstrate understanding of service protocols in their field. In addition to completing the internship in the field, students also participate in debriefing seminars at the college to share and reflect on the meaning of the internship experience.
Medical Interpreter Courses - Non-Credit
0
Credits
Medical Interpreter Anatomy and Pathophysiology
LLI CO10 3 credit(s)
This course surveys the human body in health and disease in order to expose students who plan to work in health care to the major systems of the body, common diseases, diagnostic tests, pharmaceuticals, and treatment options. Students learn how to define complex medical terms, concepts, and abbreviations and apply this knowledge according to their area of interest.
The Role of the Interpreter
LLI CO11
The course focuses on the history of health care and social work, various cultures within our society, and the role of medical and human service interpreters in the United States. Issues about advocacy that often impinge upon the interpreter-client relationship are examined. Students learn about confidentiality, patient rights, ethical and legal issues, as well as laws governing federal and state human service agencies.
Interpreting Skills I, Multilingual
LLI CO15
Students will learn interpreting and translation theory, applied interpreting skills and techniques. Emphasis will be placed on the medical and human service setting, bilingual vocabulary and phraseology, and practice of interpreting skills through role play. Students select one of the three courses listed: Spanish (CO13) , Portuguese (CO14), or Multilingual (CO15).
Interpreting Skills II, Multilingual
LLI CO18
Students integrate and apply the interpretation and translation theory learned in Skills I through extensive practice of simulations, predominantly in the consecutive mode. Students learn self-monitoring and coping strategies. They continue to develop bilingual medical and human service vocabulary and phraseology as well as explore the challenges of simultaneous interpretation. Students select one of the three courses listed: Spanish (CO16) , Portuguese (CO17), or Multilingual (CO18).
Cross Cultural Communications
LLI CO12
This course provides the participants with the opportunity to identify cross-cultural issues and their impact on the medical and human service interpretation encounter. Students will analyze concepts such as communication, culture, cultural identity, non-verbal communication, and cultural context related to interpretation. Readings of selected short stories that illustrate cross-cultural concepts will provide the basis for cultural contextual analysis.
Interpreter Internship
LLI CO30
Students strengthen and refine their medical or human service interpreter skills at a local internship site. Students are evaluated for the ability to work with providers and clients and to demonstrate understanding of health care and/or human service protocols. In addition to completing the internship in the field, students also participate in debriefing seminars at the college to share and reflect on the meaning of the internship experience.

Core Faculty

Senior Instructor

Adjunct Instructor

Pages

Admissions

  • Admission Test:

    Passing grade on TOEFL (English language proficiency test) is required for international students.

  • Admissions Office:
    1-800-829-4723
  • Application:
  • Application Fee:
    $50, nonrefundable ($100 for international students)

Program Requirements

Applicants must demonstrate proficiency in English and one target language.  Contact the program chair for more information on the oral and written assessment.

*For degree-credit option, students must enroll in a bachelor’s degree program and meet admissions requirements.

General Requirements

Official Transcript: High school or GED
One Completed Recommendation Form
Personal Statement

Learn more about General Requirements 

State Requirements

College students are required to comply with state laws regarding individual health insurance and immunization. Compliance requirements currently exist for students in Massachusetts, Virginia and Tennessee. Learn more

International Students – Additional Requirements

International Students will need to complete supplemental documentation when applying. International transcripts must also be translated prior to submission in order to be evaluated for applicability. Learn more about international student requirements.

Transfer Credit Request Form

Only needed if you wish to have prior course work evaluated for transfer credit. Learn more about transferring credits.

Tuition

  • Credits:
    18
  • Cost per credit hour:
    173.34
  • Application Fee:
    $50, nonrefundable ($100 for international students)
  • Graduation Fee:
    $110 (charged in last term)
  • Health Insurance Fee:
    $1,497 (Required for Massachusetts students only. See waiver details on Tuition & Fees page.)

Note: Rates are as of September 2013, and are subject to change without notice. Rates apply to all students, unless otherwise noted.

Financial Aid

Cambridge College offers financial aid to students in our degree programs who are enrolled at least half time. Undergraduate students must be enrolled in at least 6 credits each term. Graduate and doctoral students must be enrolled in at least 4 credits each term. Learn more

Grants, Scholarships and Loans

Cambridge College welcomes the opportunity to support your efforts to pay for college.  Federal, state and local resources in the form of grants, scholarships, loans and work-study, including Cambridge College Scholarships, are available to help defray the cost of tuition. Learn more

Getting Your Company to Help

Many companies have tuition assistance programs, designed to help their employees with their professional development. Learn more