Human Services with Addiction Studies Concentration

  • Credits: 120
  • Degree:
    Bachelor of Science

Program Description

The Bachelor of Science in Human Services at Cambridge College is guided by systemic and holistic thinking along with an appreciation of research and how it informs practice. A collaborative model of teaching and helping creates an environment where all students are encouraged to reach their potential. We do this by providing opportunities for our students to increase their knowledge and practical skills while recognizing the valuable contributions they are making in their workplaces and in their communities. Our goal is to be an integral part of the change that needs to happen to create a more just and equitable society.

Required courses provide broad-based knowledge of individuals, families, and communities, with historical and multicultural perspectives. They present a unique strengths-based, systemic and culturally relevant approach to working with people effectively across many varied settings.

Addiction Studies is for counselors, case managers, residence managers, and advocates. This concentration considers the impact of substance abuse on individuals, families and communities. It explores theories regarding addiction, various treatment approaches, and the societal consequences. The curriculum has been designed to meet the criteria for the Certified Alcohol and Drug Addiction Counselor (CADAC) certification.

Program Outcomes

  • Students gain the skills needed to work with people in a way that preserves their dignity and builds on their strengths, empowering them to address their concerns and leading to better outcomes.
  • Students learn to identify and work with the strengths inherent in individuals, families and communities.
  • Students gain practical skills for assisting people in making positive changes that will improve the quality of their lives.
  • Students are prepared for personal and professional growth.
  • Students have built a solid base for graduate studies in a wide variety of professional and academic fields.
  • Students become effective agents of positive change.
  • Fundamental understanding of the historical development and methodologies of addiction studies
  • Understanding and basic knowledge of major theories, concepts and processes relating to the study and treatment of addiction
  • Understanding the various treatment approaches in addiction
  • Understand a variety of societal consequences of addiction

Careers and Further Study

The health and human service industry has been identified by the Bureau of Labor Statistics as an area of increasing growth in the 21st century. Students majoring in human services may find themselves working and leading in a variety of settings — with adolescents in residential programs or with the elderly in nursing homes, in the community or in health centers, as program directors, as case managers or outreach workers. They work in prevention or in treatment, in after-school programs or criminal justice programs.

Addiction Studies concentrators are well prepared to enter a variety of career pathways working with people. These include clinical, educational, human service and management settings, and research. Graduates work in a myriad of institutional and private programs and agencies.

Program Chair

Carol Pepi
carol.pepi@cambridgecollege.edu

Curriculum


General Education - required courses
21
Credits

WRT101-102 and MAT101-102 may by waived if equivalent courses have been accepted in transfer. Credits will be replaced with open electives. WRT201 required if both WRT101-102 are waived; not required for students completing WRT101-102 at Cambridge. WRT090 and MAT100 required if assessment indicates need.

Principles and Processes of Adult Learning
LRN 175 3 credit(s)
Students explore theories of adult learning. They clarify the fit between their academic program and their learning and career needs, and see how their prior learning fits in. They assess their academic skills of critical thinking, mathematics, writing, and computer literacy. Students become independent learners who can effectively manage the structures, processes and expectations of undergraduate education.
College Writing I
WRT 101 3 credit(s)
Through challenging readings, class discussion, small group col­laboration, and different forms of writing, students learn the skills and process of “thinking on paper.” They learn to construct an argument or discussion that supports a clear thesis and present it effectively in a well-organized essay that observes the conventions of written English. They write academic papers that analyze and synthesize the issues suggested in two or more readings. Critical reading, critical thinking, research skills, and forms of documentation are also introduced.
Foundations of Critical Thinking
CTH 225 3 credit(s)
We learn to engage in reasoned thinking. We learn to formulate hypotheses; conceive and state definitions, and understand logical consistency and inconsistency. We explore the differences between claims of fact, value, and policy; what constitutes credible evidence; the nature of assumptions. We learn what constitutes a persuasive argument as opposed to an emotive and propagandistic one, and critically examine them. Students learn to present clear, well thought out critical arguments in writing and oral presentations. We look at the relationships among thinking, writing, speaking and listening, laying a strong foundation for improving our capacity to write, speak, and listen well.
College Mathematics I
MAT 101 3 credit(s)
Prerequisite: MAT100 If assessment indicates need. This course introduces students to the value of mathematics for students’ career and educational goals. Students will acquire mathematical study skills, gain strategies for problem solving, and develop a sound foundation for future mathematics coursework. The course is structured towards engaging students in active, applied, and real-life learning in order to facilitate mathematical problem solving and conceptual understanding.
Introduction to Computer Applications
CMP 130 3 credit(s)
Assessment available. This course provides a hands-on introduction to the personal computer, Windows, word processing, spreadsheet, presentation software, the Internet, and an overview of Word, Excel and Power-Point uses. Students begin with the basics of each application and progress through intermediate level.
College Writing II
WRT 102 3 credit(s)
WRT102 acquaints students with the academic research paper as both process and product. The course begins with an intensive review of the strategies and techniques for writing an academic essay that are covered in WRT101 and then moves to selecting and narrowing a topic, preliminary research, and establishing a focus for a 12-15 page argument research paper. The final paper includes an abstract, an introduction, discussion, conclusion, and references. Students learn how to write an annotated bibliography and use APA documentation for in-text citations and references.
College Mathematics II
MAT 102 3 credit(s)
Prerequisite: MAT101 If assessment indicates need. Challenge exam available. This course develops students’ mathematical thinking and problem solving around issues of both mathematical content and process. Students will acquire a conceptual and practical understanding of and familiarity with numbers and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and basic data analysis and probability. The course focuses on supporting students’ understanding of problem solving, reasoning and proof, communication, connections, and representations. A key feature of the course is active student involvement to support communicating mathematics in everyday and academic contexts.
General Education - distribution requirements
18
Credits

Arts & Humanities - 6 credits

Natural & Physical Sciences - 6 credits

Social Sciences - 6 credits

Open Electives
39
Credits

Choose electives and/or concentrations available at your location to support your academic interests and professional goals. (Course prerequisites must also be met.)

Human Services Major
42
Credits

New required course: BHS 306 Case Management for Human Services.

Also choose 14 credits of human service electives.

Introduction to Human Services
BHS 305 3 credit(s)
This course provides an overview of the history, philosophies, structures and systems of delivery for human services. Drawing from a variety of resources including case studies, students learn what the programs are, whom they serve, and how they work; they explore protocols and procedures to evaluate their success. Particular attention is paid to questions of poverty and wealth and their impact upon public welfare. Students become familiar with ethical issues involved in working with different populations and communities, and consider the implications for public policy.
Systems Thinking in Psychology
PSY 110 3 credit(s)
Systems thinking in psychology is introduced as a theoretical approach to understanding the relationships and interactions of individuals, families, groups, and organizations. Attention is paid to application of the systemic model and how it differs from the linear model, when studying human interactions, analyzing social problems, and developing interventions. Students apply systems theory to problems they select from their daily lives or jobs.
Understanding Family & Community Systems
BHS 315 3 credit(s)
This course builds on systems thinking by applying systemic concepts to understand the makeup and functioning of families and communities. Students review the characteristics and interrelationships among family and community systems, and learn how to assess their respective strengths, resources, needs, and coping strategies. Local community issues impacting families, such as kinds of employment opportunities and unifying traditions on the one hand, and violence and discrimination on the other, are addressed. Students use assessment models to look at their own life situations such as job, family, neighborhood. Students interact with their peers and others seeking to make an impact with families and communities.
Community Building Principles & Strategies
BHS 320 3 credit(s)
This course introduces the history, theory, and practice of community building in order to increase the effectiveness of people working to improve their communities. It increases students’ capacity and engagement in community planning, advocacy, organizing, decision-making and evaluation. The fundamental principles of community building are explored: Such as incorporating those directly affected by policies at the heart of dialogue and community building; valuing racial and cultural diversity as the foundation for wholeness; promoting active citizenship and political empowerment, building on community strengths and assets; ensuring access to fundamental opportunities and removing obstacles to equal opportunity; supporting and enhancing the well-being of children and their families; fostering sustained commitment, coordination and collaboration based on a shared vision and mutual respect. This course is based on The Boston Community Building Curriculum, developed by the Boston Foundation and currently being implemented by Interaction Institute for Social Change.
Strategies for Change
BHS 420 3 credit(s)
This course provides theoretical frameworks for understanding the process of change and its implications for individuals and families. We look at intervention systemically and in human service agencies, substance abuse treatment programs, medical and mental health centers, and schools. Students identify barriers to change and examine all aspects of an intervention process, from assessment and treatment planning, to choice of strategies, and implementation. A variety of techniques are presented for use with individuals, families and larger groups. Preventive, problem-solving approaches are discussed as well as strategies for creating new solutions. Students hear from agents of change, analyze their own personal and professional experience, and practice techniques in class and, as appropriate, at their work sites.
Developmental Psychology
PSY 210 3 credit(s)
The CLEP exam in Human Growth and Development is accepted as equivalent. This course helps students understand the ways in which people from various cultures and countries develop and change over their lifetimes. Students focus on particular topics such as cognition, social development, or identity, and follow the topic across the lifespan. In this way, we get away from a “stage theory” approach and focus instead on the variety of ways that people live out developmental scripts. Students are introduced to terms and concepts which are basic to a cross-cultural view of development, such as developmental orientation, cross-cultural “perspective,” and a systems approach. These concepts are applied to each topic area, so that students learn, for example, how cognitive development is affected by living in different cultures and how one’s identity is influenced by the various systems within which we live. In addition to reviewing readings and discussion, each class features a group exercise to help students understand and apply information and concepts.
Human Services Internship I
BHS 470 4 credit(s)
Internship experience gives students opportunity to practice knowledge and skills gained in the classroom, and to become familiar with the structure and functioning of organizations and community agencies. Under agency supervision, students provide counseling, advocacy, research, information, referral, and similar services, and then document and reflect on their activities. The accompanying seminar includes students from varied placements, who give and receive feed?back on case presentations and agency and organization issues. All internships sites must be approved in advance by the concentration director and close ties are maintained between the agency supervisor and the course instructor. Students wishing to use their place of employment as a site should contact the concentration director to start the approval process before signing up for this course. The parameters (number of hours, days, etc.) are negotiated between the site, the student, and the College; and a joint contract is signed. Site supervisors must be immediately available to students, and must provide weekly individual or small group supervision. Students should be at their field sites approximately 6-8 hours a week and participate in a 2-hour/week seminar. Satisfactory completion requires satisfactory work at the site and the College seminar. Internship II continues Internship I or covers a new or special internship situation; offered as a focused study.
Human Services Capstone
BHS 490 3 credit(s)
Prerequisites: 90 credits minimum, including WRT101 and WRT102. The Capstone is a comprehensive research project which is the culminating academic activity that helps to synthesize students’ learning in the undergraduate human services program. It is an opportunity to explore a topic of personal or professional interest in human services and to create an original project or piece of research that contributes to the field. The Capstone is 25-30 pages in length and follows a research paper format appropriate to the field of study. Students work together in class and meet or communicate individually with the instructor as needed. Those who take an additional term to complete the Capstone must register for BHS491 and pass before graduating.
Concentration: Addiction Studies
18
Credits

Concentrations are accepted as open electives (see above).

Introduction to Addictions: Theory and Practice
BHS 401 3 credit(s)
This course presents concepts and practices related to a broad spectrum of addictions and addictive behaviors, including theoretical models of addiction, terminology, review of substances and their effects, treatment strategies and programs. The impact of culture and ethnicity on substance use and abuse is addressed. Important current issues are discussed, such as difficulties in combining mental health and substance abuse perspectives. Students learn first-hand about a variety of treatment programs through guest speakers. Attendance at at least one addictions support group is strongly encouraged (AA, NA etc.).
Family Systems and Addictions
BHS 411 3 credit(s)
This course provides an overview of family systems, family therapy, and the history of efforts to deal with substance abuse/alcoholism in recent decades. Topics covered include theoretical models of working with families, terminology, the impact of various family members’ substance use, agencies, the process of recovery, and treatment programs. We identify methods of working with families affected by substance abuse, considering social, cultural, and environmental factors. Students learn to work systemically with parents, spouses, and children. They learn what constitutes comprehensive family treatment and the resources that are available to families, including but not limited to Al-Anon. Current research is reviewed.
Mental Health and Substance Abuse
BHS 421 3 credit(s)
This course explores mental health issues and multiple problems that may be common among a substance-abusing population, such as depression, PTSD, schizophrenia, personality disorders, HIV/Aids, and homelessness. Students begin to understand major symptoms and terminology. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of as­sessment and diagnosis, and issues specific to gender and culture. The course develops a heightened awareness of mental health issues and a broad understanding of co-occurring disorders, enabling students to address client needs more holistically with a focus on their strengths.
Ethical Issues in Substance Abuse
BHS 360 3 credit(s)
Prerequisite: BHS401 or experience in the field of addictions (permission from the instructor). This course explores current ethical issues common among a substance abusing population, such as mandatory treatment, involuntary treatment, duty to warn requirements, criminalization, and perinatal addiction. The course also covers professionals’ competence, confidentiality, accountability, client welfare, emotional health/personal wellness, and financial concerns. Students begin to understand the ethical debates and the foundations the arguments are based on. This course uses as a foundational code of ethics the Principles of Professional Standards for Substance Abuse Professionals. Students gain increased awareness of the ethical issues in the field and a broader understanding of the debates; they can address client needs more holistically and engage in public discourse on the issues.
Women and Addictions
BHS 302 3 credit(s)
This course explores addictions that women have struggled with historically and some now common to women. We discuss the relevance of gender-specific treatment for women, the “real life” complexities of women’s lives, the barriers that keep them from receiving the treatment they need, and the most common co-occurring disorders faced by women who experience addiction problems. The impact of the media is also considered. Students examine various theories in relation to treatment of substance-abusing women. A systemic approach is taken to the complex circumstances of these women’s lives.
Adolescent Drug Prevention
BHS 361 3 credit(s)
This course is designed to provide a wide range of practical and theoretical information about the adolescent drug prevention programs. Student will learn about the adolescent substances of choice, extent of their drug use and abuse, and types of school-based and community-based interventions. Multicultural considerations in the development and assessment of prevention programs will also be examined. It is recommended that Introduction to Addictions be taken prior to taking this course.

Core Faculty

Senior Instructor

Adjunct Instructor

Pages

Admissions

  • Admission Test:

    Passing grade on TOEFL (English language proficiency test) is required for international students.

  • Admissions Office:
    1-800-829-4723
  • Application:
  • Application Fee:
    $50, nonrefundable ($100 for international students)

General Requirements

Official Transcript: High school or GED
One Completed Recommendation Form
Personal Statement

Learn more about General Requirements 

State Requirements

College students are required to comply with state laws regarding individual health insurance and immunization. Compliance requirements currently exist for students in Massachusetts, Virginia and Tennessee. Learn more

International Students – Additional Requirements

International Students will need to complete supplemental documentation when applying. International transcripts must also be translated prior to submission in order to be evaluated for applicability. Learn more about international student requirements.

Transfer Credit Request Form

Only needed if you wish to have prior course work evaluated for transfer credit. Learn more about transferring credits.

Tuition

  • Credits:
    120
  • Cost per credit hour:
    $378
  • Application Fee:
    $50, nonrefundable ($100 for international students)
  • Graduation Fee:
    $110 (charged in last term)
  • Health Insurance Fee:
    $1,497 (Required for Massachusetts students only. See waiver details on Tuition & Fees page.)

Note: Rates are as of September 2013, and are subject to change without notice. Rates apply to all students, unless otherwise noted.

Financial Aid

Cambridge College offers financial aid to students in our degree programs who are enrolled at least half time. Undergraduate students must be enrolled in at least 6 credits each term. Graduate and doctoral students must be enrolled in at least 4 credits each term. Learn more

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Cambridge College welcomes the opportunity to support your efforts to pay for college.  Federal, state and local resources in the form of grants, scholarships, loans and work-study, including Cambridge College Scholarships, are available to help defray the cost of tuition. Learn more

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